On Your Mark, Get Set, Read!

On Your Mark, Get Set, Read!

               Hartford Public Library 2016 Summer Reading Program June 4 – August 20, 2016   Earn incentives by logging reading, attending events, and completes activites this summer!  For every 15 activities you complete, you earn a free book and a chance to win the grand prize—a LeapFrog LeapPad tablet! How It Works                                                                                             1. Sign up for the program.                                                                       2. Log your reading and activities to earn prizes.                                                            3.Keep reading all summer to be entered for the grand prize! Get started by registering on the link below…. To sign up and track your progress,click here  For a printable log, click here On Your Mark, Get Set, ...
Great Read Alouds for Kids: Babies to Grade 3

Great Read Alouds for Kids: Babies to Grade 3

  “It’s a busy life filled with lots of things to do and even more distractions. But there’s one pursuit that can be fun for everyone involved, plus it has benefits that will have a lifelong impact. All that’s needed is a comfy place, an adult, one child or more, and a good book to share.”   How do you choose what to read aloud to your child? The first thing to ask yourself is simply: Do I like it? Then consider if you’re comfortable with the content. Is there something that you may want to omit or that you’d rather not tackle with your child? Children seem to know instinctively when an adult really likes something or if they’re just faking it. Sometimes children respond differently to a book than the adults who try to share it. A book that the adult thinks is fantastic may get a ho-hum or downright negative response from the listener or sometimes the reverse is true, too. That’s OK; children have tastes, though sometimes they’re just not ready for a particular book. It’s perfectly acceptable to put a book down or not finish it. Just try another one. You might want to keep in mind that if a book resounds with the child, chances are you’ll wind up reading it frequently. A book has got to wear well for both the reader and the listener. Previewing a book, reading it aloud, before reading it aloud with a child is always recommended! Speaking of wearing well, do you like the sounds of the words you’re reading? Are they interesting to hear? Try reading...
Help Your Preschooler Gain Self-Control

Help Your Preschooler Gain Self-Control

When asked about school readiness skills, many teachers say children who succeed in kindergarten know when and how to control their impulses. They can follow through when a task is difficult and listen to directions for a few minutes. These skills are linked to self-control. Children can develop them at preschool and at home. Here are a few ways families can help children learn self-control. 1. Change the rules of a game to make it an opposite game. For example, instead of playing the familiar version of Simon Says, play Simon Doesn’t Say. Explain the new rule in words and actions: “Do the opposite of what Simon asks you to do. If Simon Says ‘Touch your head,’ you should touch your toes.” Be sure to demonstrate how this works. Keep directions simple. Take turns being Simon. 2.Finish what you are doing, then respond to requests for attention. For example, if you are on the phone and your child asks for something (and it’s not an emergency), let her know you need to take time to complete your conversation. This is a good way to let your child practice waiting for a short time. 3. Do activities together that require following directions. For example, put together a model, play follow the leader, or cook or bake: “I’m going to read the recipe aloud. Listen carefully so we will both know what to do. I’ll read them again as we do each step.” 4. Help children understand how long they will have to wait for something and suggest activities to do while they wait. Say to your child, “Grammy and Grampy...
Everyday Early Math

Everyday Early Math

During the early years when children begin to learn language and social skills, they’re also learning math through playtime and everyday interactions with their parents and caregivers. Simple, everyday activities like counting toes during bath time or stacking blocks can help children develop early math skills which can have a big impact on school readiness. To help support early math skills for young learners, Too Small to Fail partnered with ZERO TO THREE on a series of videos highlighting the foundation of early math skills in the first five years of life, and fun activities parents and caregivers can use to support this learning as part of a regular daily routine. Our latest videos focus on patterns, measurement, addition and subtraction, and are available in both Spanish and English! Here are a few fun and easy ways to help turn everyday moments into opportunities to support children’s early math skills: Everyday Fun with Patterns Creating patterns is the ability to put objects, colors, sounds or actions in a repeated order. It is as easy as lining up leaves and rocks at the park. Learning to notice, create and continue patterns can help children understand more advanced math concepts later on. Activity: You and your child can make patterns together by putting objects in order by size or quantity, or stacking different colored blocks. For example, you might say, “Red block, blue block, red block, blue block. What comes next?” For more tips on patterns, watch this video http://toosmall.org/video/lets-talk-about-math-everyday-fun-with-patterns or download our handout. Everyday Fun with Measurement As early as 12 months old, babies can begin to understand comparison and measurement concepts,...
Does Reading Aloud Really Matter?

Does Reading Aloud Really Matter?

Check out this awesome and fun infographic about how important it is to read aloud with your children Read Aloud 15 MINUTES is a non-profit organization that is working to make reading aloud every day for at least 15 minutes the new standard in child care. When every child is read aloud to for 15 minutes every day from birth, more children will be ready to learn when they enter kindergarten, more children will have the literacy skills needed to succeed in school, and more children will be prepared for a productive and meaningful life after school....