Raising Strong Girls

Raising Strong Girls

Research shows that early experiences in children’s lives have a lifelong impact on their learning and development. From the moment they’re born, babies learn to feel safe and secure in their world through the relationships they have with their parents and caregivers. When adults provide little ones with consistent, nurturing care from the very beginning, they help them to develop healthy attitudes about themselves and create trusting relationships with others. Developing self-confidence is essential to children’s healthy development and success—both in school and in life. Women’s History Month provides great opportunities for parents to share meaningful conversations and stories about positive female role models with their children—both boys and girls. Sharing books is a wonderful way to expose our children to strong, caring, thoughtful, and inspiring female characters of all ages. For book ideas for young children, check out some of Chelsea Clinton Shares Her Favorite Kids’ Books With Strong Female Characters.  You can use your favorite books to spark conversations about girls and women you and your child know and admire. When we incorporate these types of stories and discussions into our daily interactions, we can help children celebrate girls and women—not just this month but throughout their lives.   Tip of the Week Helping girls develop confidence in STEM during the early years lays the foundation for their future success. Research shows that activities as simple as using math and science words in everyday conversations can help children do better in STEM later on. You can take advantage of daily routines to introduce your child to concepts of measurement, shapes, or addition and subtraction! During snack time,...
How can you make sure your teen is safe online?

How can you make sure your teen is safe online?

As teens get older, a natural part of their development includes acting more independently and taking risks, both in person and online. Most of this behavior is normal and will contribute to your teen becoming a mature and responsible adult. By staying involved in what they’re doing online — which includes opening conversations about online activity as well as sharing favorite websites and apps with each other — you can inject your own values to counteract the negatives and reinforce the positives. Much of what teens discover and contribute online can be positive and enriching. But there are some risks to their privacy, reputations, and even physical safety unless teens follow certain guidelines. Here are some Internet-safety recommendations for parents of teens: Discuss a code of conduct. Tell your kids that if they wouldn’t say something to someone’s face, they shouldn’t text it, IM it, or post it. Remind your teens to use social networks’ privacy settings so only their close friends and family members can see their stuff. Tell them not to send pictures to strangers or view pictures that strangers send to them. Explain to them that even messages and photos that promise to self-delete can be saved and shared by others. Keep passwords private. Remind your teens that people aren’t necessarily who they say they are online. Read More from the website...