Just as our childcare center is a place for loving, living and growing – we wanted to make our website equally as valuable to you, our parents, families & members of the community.

We’ve put together some links to outside resources that have valuable information for assisting your young family to build stronger relationships and live a happier, healthier life! If you find something you’d like printed out, feel free to use our Family Resource computer located in the Great Room here at the Women’s League.

TOPICS

Behavior & Development

Learning Milestones

Health & Safety at Home

Children & Technology

Healthy Relationships for Children & Adults

 

Developing Your Child’s Sense of Humor

Did you know that babies make jokes before they can even talk? They are little comedians! Research shows that even babies can try to act goofy and make you laugh. Humor starts early and has many benefits for children’s development. Laughing together is a great way to bond with your child, and a sense of humor can boost children’s self-esteem and help them handle challenges. Here are some helpful resources to start giggling together: A sense of humor is a learned quality that you can help your child develop! Depending on their age, children appreciate different types of humor. Find out what’s funny to your little one so you can laugh together and help her learn to appreciate and share humor. To encourage your children to develop a sense of humor, create a humor-rich environment for them. Reading funny books is a great start! Check out this great list of books to look for at your local library. Tip of the Week: Children find humor in the unexpected. That’s why your little one laughs when you put socks on your hands and make funny faces! Children also love rhyming sounds, especially funny rhymes like banana, zanana, fanana. You can even make up silly rhymes using your child’s...

10 Tips for Raising a Compassionate Infant-Toddler

  Recent research shows that infants and toddlers are far more empathetic than we once thought.  While they have short fuses, and don’t cope well with sharing, they are capable of being compassionate.  With this in mind, here are ten tips I use in the classroom to help infants and toddlers become pro-social that families can also try at home. 1.  Be respectful, patient, and loving to your infants and toddlers and everyone else. Infants imitate what they see.  Model saying “please” and “thank you”, touching gently, using your words, using a calm voice, cleaning up your messes, helping others, and sharing your things: “Thank you for the Cheerio, would you like some of my raisins?” 2.  Media is powerful!  Read books about feelings with positive social interactions and discuss them.  If your child watches television, watch too, and talk about the situations and emotions that happen in the shows, especially if the actions are antisocial. “Caillou said that Philip could not use his ball – how did that make Philip feel?  Do you think taking turns might make Philip feel better?”  3.  When things are upsetting your toddler, you can engage your inner child.  Doll or puppet play can help your child explore feelings and perspectives.   Puppet, “I don’t want to take a bath!”  You to puppet, “You sound mad – you don’t like baths!  I wonder what things could make bath-time fun?” 4.  When people are upset, model compassion – talk about the problem and offer help. “That boy fell off the climber, let’s go see if he’s ok!  His daddy picked him up and the...

Everyday Early Math

During the early years when children begin to learn language and social skills, they’re also learning math through playtime and everyday interactions with their parents and caregivers. Simple, everyday activities like counting toes during bath time or stacking blocks can help children develop early math skills which can have a big impact on school readiness. To help support early math skills for young learners, Too Small to Fail partnered with ZERO TO THREE on a series of videos highlighting the foundation of early math skills in the first five years of life, and fun activities parents and caregivers can use to support this learning as part of a regular daily routine. Our latest videos focus on patterns, measurement, addition and subtraction, and are available in both Spanish and English! Here are a few fun and easy ways to help turn everyday moments into opportunities to support children’s early math skills: Everyday Fun with Patterns Creating patterns is the ability to put objects, colors, sounds or actions in a repeated order. It is as easy as lining up leaves and rocks at the park. Learning to notice, create and continue patterns can help children understand more advanced math concepts later on. Activity: You and your child can make patterns together by putting objects in order by size or quantity, or stacking different colored blocks. For example, you might say, “Red block, blue block, red block, blue block. What comes next?” For more tips on patterns, watch this video http://toosmall.org/video/lets-talk-about-math-everyday-fun-with-patterns or download our handout. Everyday Fun with Measurement As early as 12 months old, babies can begin to understand comparison and measurement concepts,...

Let’s Celebrate Diversity

We live in a diverse world filled with rich traditions, cultures, stories, and routines. As a parent or caregiver, you can help your child develop an appreciation and respect for others starting at an early age. Research shows that babies as young as 6 months old can notice differences in the ways people look. By helping your child learn about his/her own culture and the cultures of others you can help him/her build a strong sense of identity. Everyday moments like reading or dinner times can be opportunities to help your child develop positive attitudes about other people’s cultures as well as his/her own. By fostering an appreciation of differences and similarities, you can help your child learn to love what makes people unique and value these differences in the world around him/her. Here are a few tips on what you can do to help your child appreciate diversity: 1.Expose your little one to other cultures. You can teach your child to say “hello” or “thank you” in the language of people from other cultures who live in your community, or attend local cultural events and festivals. Read more on how you can help your child understand and respect differences on PBS Parents. 2.Foster respect in your child. You can play a great role in teaching your little one about differences, and how to best respond to them: with respect. This Huffington Post Parents article shares great tips about what you can do as a parent to raise kind and accepting children. 3.Help your little one take pride in his or her identity. When learning to appreciate differences, children...

Ways to Improve Your Relationship With Your Children

Someone once said that parenting is a lot like football:  children are on the offensive (trying to cross the line of scrimmage of our rules) and parents are on the defense (trying to close the gaps and present a barrier that cannot be penetrated).  While the analogy is cute, it has a fundamental flaw in its presuppositions.  As parents, we are on the SAME team as our children, not opposing ones. If we consider ourselves as defender of the rules and expectations of the home and our children as set on breaking them, we create an innately adversarial environment.  This “us against them” mentality undermines what God has in store for us as a family unit.  He has created us as relational beings.  HE is a relational being.  He wants relationship with us; that is why He sent His Son to redeem us.  His desire is that we will be in relationship with the members of our family as well.  Just as the body of Christ functions best when each member does his part, the family functions best when each member is supported and encouraged to do their part.  When one member is “sidelined” the whole team is affected. The idea of a relationship between parents and children has been skewed in our culture.  We have confused relationship with friendship.  We seem to know that the relationship is essential, but often our attempts to achieve this have ventured too far into friendship territory.  It seems like a difficult balance to achieve, but you can have a close and meaningful relationship with your children and still maintain your position as...

Tips To Make Your Home Safer

Child’s Room/Bedroom Does your baby’s changing table have a safety belt? Are all painted cribs, bassinets, and high chairs made after 1978? (Prior to this, paint was lead based.) Are crib slats less than 2-3/8 inches (6 centimeters) apart? Are the crib’s headboard and footboard free of large cut-outs? Is all of the hardware on the crib secure? Is the crib mattress firm and flat? Does it fit snugly in the crib? Is the crib free of a drop side? Is the crib free of soft pillows, large stuffed animals, bumper pads, and soft bedding? Have any strings or ribbons been clipped off hanging mobiles and crib toys? Are window blind and curtain cords tied with clothespins or specially designed cord clips? Are they kept well out of reach and away from cribs? Are dressers secured to walls with drawers closed? Do the lids on toy chests or toy storage containers have a lid support to keep them from slamming shut? Are all toy chests non-locking? Has a window guard been placed on any window that isn’t an emergency exit? Are any night-lights in the room not touching any fabric like bedspreads or curtains? Does your child wear flame-retardant sleepwear? Is there a smoke alarm outside the bedroom? Have you removed all drawstrings from your child’s clothing? Adult’s Bedroom Are all medication bottles, loose pills, coins, scissors, and any other small or sharp objects out of reach? Are window blind and curtain cords tied with clothespins or specially designed cord clips? If you own firearms: Are they stored in a securely locked case out of kids’ reach? All firearms...

Developmental Stages of School Age Children

The transition into the school-age years coincides with a shift from an egocentric way of thinking – which is not to be confused with selfishness, but rather a child’s inability to put themselves in other people’s shoes – to a more mature, perceptive, and imaginative way of thinking. Throughout this developmental phase, your child will demonstrate a genuine enthusiasm for learning new concepts, make strides in gaining self-confidence, and develop the necessary skills to understand the world and people around them. At age 5, your child will enter kindergarten, their first taste of the world of school. And by age 8, they will be able to properly articulate their feelings, a range of ideas, and effectively solve problems through dialogue. Milestones 5- to 6-year-olds Vocabulary increasing to approximately 2,000 words Can compose sentences with five or more words Can count up to 10 objects at one time Know left and right Begin to reason and argue; uses words like why and because Can categorize objects: “These are toys; these are books.” Understand concepts like yesterday, today, and tomorrow Can copy complex shapes, such as a diamond Should be sounding out simple words like “hang”, “neat”, “jump” and “sank” Are able to sit at a desk , follow teacher instructions, and independently do simple in-class assignments 7- to 8-year-olds Develop a longer attention span Are willing to take on more responsibility (i.e. chores) Understand fractions and the concept of space Understand money Can tell time Can name months and days of week in order Enjoy reading a book on their own Parenting tips Get your child a library card. Regular visits...

Managing Problem Behavior at Home

One of the biggest challenges parents face is managing difficult or defiant behavior on the part of children. Whether they’re refusing to put on their shoes, or throwing full-blown tantrums, you can find yourself at a loss for an effective way to respond. For parents at their wits end, behavioral therapy techiques can provide a roadmap to calmer, more consistent ways to manage problem behaviors and offers a chance to help children develop the skills they need to regulate their own behaviors.: ABC’s of behavior management To understand and respond effectively to problematic behavior, you have to think about what came before it, as well as what comes after it. There are three important aspects to any given behavior: Antecedents: preceding factors that make a behavior more or less likely to occur. Another, more familiar term for this is triggers.Learning and anticipating andecedents is an extremely helpful tool in PREVENTING misbehavior.   Behaviors: the specific actions you are trying to encourage or discourage.   Consequences: the results that naturally or logically follow a behavior. Consequences-positive or negative-affect the likelihood of a behavior recurring. And the more immediate the consequence, the more powerful it is. Define behaviors The first step in a good behavior management plan is to identify target behaviors. These behaviors should be specific (so everyone is clear on what is expected), observable, and measurable (so everyone can agree whether or not the behavior happened). An example of poorly defined behavior is “acting up,” or “being good.”  A well-defined behavior would be running around the room (bad) or or starting homework on time (good). Antecedents, the good and...