Just as our childcare center is a place for loving, living and growing – we wanted to make our website equally as valuable to you, our parents, families & members of the community.

We’ve put together some links to outside resources that have valuable information for assisting your young family to build stronger relationships and live a happier, healthier life! If you find something you’d like printed out, feel free to use our Family Resource computer located in the Great Room here at the Women’s League.

TOPICS

Behavior & Development

Learning Milestones

Health & Safety at Home

Children & Technology

Healthy Relationships for Children & Adults

 

Let’s Talk About Early Math

Babies doing math? That’s right! Children’s brains are ready to understand number concepts from a very early age. Early math skills have a big impact on children’s school readiness—in fact, research has found that a strong understanding of early math concepts predicts both a child’s future math and literacy skills. The roots of early math skills begin developing from birth, through babies’ everyday play and interactions with parents and caregivers.  The good news is, math is all around us, and routine activities and games provide opportunities to help develop these important early math skills while having fun and bonding with your little one!   In Case You Missed It Together with Highlights, we created a digital guide with fun and easy activities that you can do with your child anywhere, from driving in the car or shopping for groceries, to doing laundry or setting the table. For example, you can introduce addition while your child is playing with blocks. Say, “Let’s put all your red blocks in one pile and your blue ones in another. Now, let’s count how many blocks there are all together.” Check out the guide for more ideas—it even includes fun videos with animated tips! Tip of the Week Your little one’s first math lessons could take place at the grocery store! For example, you can compare the size of fruits and vegetables! You can ask: “Which one is bigger, the banana or the strawberry?” Find more fun early math activities in our new digital guide...

Behind Every Child Behavior, There is a Feeling

Challenging behavior in young children often triggers strong reactions in parents and caregivers. When parents feel angry, overwhelmed, frustrated or embarrassed, it can be difficult to figure out what is driving a young child’s actions. Sometimes a child may even seem to be trying to get a rise out of their parent! But behind every child’s behavior is a feeling that they’re experiencing, too. When parents and caregivers learn to recognize the feelings behind their children’s behaviors, parenting is easier. Also, the more parents understand about their children’s behaviors, the closer they feel to their children and the better they can express care and love to them. Children who feel cared for and loved develop stronger social-emotional skills like confidence and self-esteem, which make it easier for them to manage their emotions so they can do better in school and beyond. The behaviors babies and toddlers use to communicate with their parents and caregivers depend a lot on their age and development. Very young babies cry when they’re hungry, uncomfortable, or tired. As they get older, they learn to communicate using words, facial expressions, and gestures, too. By observing their children closely, and with a little practice, parents and caregivers can learn to translate the behavior they see—throwing food off a high-chair, for example, or having a tantrum when dropped off at child care. The effort to understand the feelings behind a child’s behavior can bring a parent and child closer, and help that parent teach their child the social-emotional skills they will need to learn and grow. But how do you know if a baby is crying at...

Raising Strong Girls

Research shows that early experiences in children’s lives have a lifelong impact on their learning and development. From the moment they’re born, babies learn to feel safe and secure in their world through the relationships they have with their parents and caregivers. When adults provide little ones with consistent, nurturing care from the very beginning, they help them to develop healthy attitudes about themselves and create trusting relationships with others. Developing self-confidence is essential to children’s healthy development and success—both in school and in life. Women’s History Month provides great opportunities for parents to share meaningful conversations and stories about positive female role models with their children—both boys and girls. Sharing books is a wonderful way to expose our children to strong, caring, thoughtful, and inspiring female characters of all ages. For book ideas for young children, check out some of Chelsea Clinton Shares Her Favorite Kids’ Books With Strong Female Characters.  You can use your favorite books to spark conversations about girls and women you and your child know and admire. When we incorporate these types of stories and discussions into our daily interactions, we can help children celebrate girls and women—not just this month but throughout their lives.   Tip of the Week Helping girls develop confidence in STEM during the early years lays the foundation for their future success. Research shows that activities as simple as using math and science words in everyday conversations can help children do better in STEM later on. You can take advantage of daily routines to introduce your child to concepts of measurement, shapes, or addition and subtraction! During snack time,...

The Magic of Reading

“You’re never too old, too wacky, too wild, to pick up a book and read with a child.” –Dr. Seuss National Read Across America Day, celebrated today on Dr. Seuss’ birthday, reminds us that reading with your child isn’t just about reading — it accomplishes a number of great things. When parents read with their child on a regular basis—daily is fantastic—not only are they supporting their child’s ability to develop strong reading skills, they’re strengthening the relationship between their child and the world around him. As a parents, some of your most valued moments have been reading aloud with your children. First, the more a young child is exposed to books and reading aloud from birth, the more they move towards an amazing shift in their understanding of the world around them. You see, a younger child may not understand that printed words are actually conveying information. They think a reader is telling stories just by looking at the pictures in the book. So when they start to recognize that words are not mere decoration, but are telling us something, they’re reaching a milestone we call “print awareness.” We may not remember that time ourselves because we were so young. But when a child is read to, they achieve that awareness earlier, and are better prepared for gaining even more information from books as a result. Reading is a loving, reciprocal, nurturing interaction with a caregiver — and those high-quality relationships are the most important thing that helps children develop and thrive. For families that may not have ever had a model for how to interact with young children,...

Back in the Habit: New Routines to Kick-Off the School Year

Summer is almost over, and that means one very important thing: back to school season has begun! In the next few weeks and months, families across the country will start preparing for a new year full of learning — both inside the classroom and beyond. For many families, this season marks the beginning of a brand new routine as their little ones get ready to start school for the very first time. The transition from summertime to school time can be difficult for parents, caregivers, and children. That’s why this week, we’re exploring ways to help ease the process and make the most of your back to school or child care routines. Research shows that simple, predictable routines can help children develop new, healthy habits that will help them start each day ready to learn and experience the world around them. For example, having a routine can help your baby learn self control as well as guide positive behavior. Make a School Year’s Resolution To empower parents with practical advice to support their child’s overall development, NBC News Education Nation is sharing a free Parent Toolkit so you can support the students in your life who are preparing to go back to school. Whether you’re a parent, a grandparent, another family member or even a teacher, you can help make a difference. Make a School Year’s Resolution with the Parent Toolkit community and be entered to win gift cards for back‐to‐school supplies. Share your School Year Resolution and join the community by visiting ParentToolkit.com.   Tip of the Week Sing lullabies with your baby every night. As part of encouraging consistent bedtime...

Let’s Celebrate Dads!

This week, as families come together to celebrate and honor  fathers, we want to recognize just how special and important dads are to raising happy, healthy babies. Just like moms, dads play a critical role in forming the loving and supportive bonds that nurture their newborns’ brain development, physical growth, and happiness. Studies show that children with caring and involved fathers get better grades in school, have more confidence, and are able to cope with complicated problems and emotions that they encounter on a daily basis. In celebration of Father’s Day, we’re sharing some helpful tips for how fathers can make the most of each moment they spend with the littlest learners in their life. Tip of the Week Set aside some time to play, talk, read, sing – and laugh! – with your baby. Laughing with your baby helps build emotional bonds, and laughter can release stress and improve your mood! While laughing with your baby, ask them questions like, “What makes you laugh?” or “Am I being silly?” to help your child learn to express their emotions and feelings. Family Activities for Father’s Day Do you have something special planned to celebrate Father’s Day? It’s never too late to plan something fun for the whole family! Check out some simple, low-cost ideas for spending meaningful time with your family...

Education Resources E-Newsletter

Education Resources E-Newsletter Vol. 12, No. 5 May 2016 In this Issue * Education Week Survey: Number of States Choosing Common Core Tests Dips to 21 *Encourage Middle School Parents to Step Up and Stay Involved *The Latest Education News from All Over the Internet *Q&A: Closing out fiscal-year budgets on time and on target Education Week Survey: Number of States Choosing Common Core Tests Dips to 21 Read full article here Encourage Middle School Parents to Step Up and Stay Involved As you know, parents can play a critical role in supporting their child’s success at school, and middle school is a particularly important stage. But it can be challenging to reach parents with important advice and information. That’s where our Parenting Corner — Parent Involvement Center (Middle School Edition) in English (EM91675) and Spanish (EM91989), comes in. This take-one information center comes with 50 copies of 6 engaging magazines — each highlighting an important middle school issue — a sturdy wire display rack, plus 3 copies of a motivational poster! The magazines are: Parenting Corner — Achieving Homework Success (Middle School Edition) (EM95560)T Parenting Corner — Help Stop Bullying! (Middle School Edition) (EM95548)T Parenting Corner — Raising A Drug-Free Child (Middle School Edition) (EM91304)T Parenting Corner — Ensuring Your Child’s School Attendance (Middle School Edition) (EM91087)T Parenting Corner — Encouraging Respect & Responsibility (Middle School Edition) (EM91187)T Parenting Corner — Staying Active In Your Child’s Education (Middle School Edition) (EM95517)T We’re so certain that you’ll appreciate the quality and effectiveness of the publications featured in this information center, we’re offering you an opportunity to have samples mailed right...

The Special Role of Moms

This week we are celebrating mothers and the special bond they share with their babies, which plays an enormous role in children’s early development. Maternal bonds help children build a strong sense of safety and self-esteem, which are vital to healthy social-emotional development. It starts with simple, everyday interactions. Talking, reading and singing about the things you see and do together is a great way to start building bonds from birth! Research shows that the emotional bond created between a mother and her baby can help build healthy bodies and minds! How do you create this bond? By being responsive to your baby’s needs: soothing her when she cries, comforting her when she’s upset, and interacting with her on a daily basis. Lots of warm hugs, kisses, and smiles build bonds, too! Bonding with your newborn baby is a very important and pleasurable aspects of parenting, for both mothers and fathers. Check out this great resource to learn all you need to know about bonding with your baby Tip of The Week Newborn babies –even if they can’t talk yet—love to hear your voice and can respond to your words, touch and eye-to-eye contact. Hold your baby close and talk with him or her. You can talk about anything: your day, a story, what you are doing in the moment. Your baby will love the attention and the sound of your voice! In Case You Missed It     Newborn babies –even if they can’t talk yet—love to hear your voice and can respond to your words, touch and eye-to-eye contact. Hold your baby close and talk with him or...

Developing Your Child’s Sense of Humor

Did you know that babies make jokes before they can even talk? They are little comedians! Research shows that even babies can try to act goofy and make you laugh. Humor starts early and has many benefits for children’s development. Laughing together is a great way to bond with your child, and a sense of humor can boost children’s self-esteem and help them handle challenges. Here are some helpful resources to start giggling together: A sense of humor is a learned quality that you can help your child develop! Depending on their age, children appreciate different types of humor. Find out what’s funny to your little one so you can laugh together and help her learn to appreciate and share humor. To encourage your children to develop a sense of humor, create a humor-rich environment for them. Reading funny books is a great start! Check out this great list of books to look for at your local library. Tip of the Week: Children find humor in the unexpected. That’s why your little one laughs when you put socks on your hands and make funny faces! Children also love rhyming sounds, especially funny rhymes like banana, zanana, fanana. You can even make up silly rhymes using your child’s...